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Archive for the ‘Flora and fauna’ Category

A play about zoo animals from the viewpoint of the animals

Animals in a zoo

I was asked why I wrote a play about zoo animals.

The lives of animals in a zoo and petting zoo are not usually the focus of entertainment, so a play is a good medium for sharing how animals feel. We look at animals when we visit a zoo and we may wonder about their lives, but we don’t know how they feel–until we read or watch this play. As with all my Energy Guidance Complete writing, I was directed to write Zoo Conversations so that is why I wrote it.

Here’s what the (human) Narrator has to say in Zoo Conversations:

NARRATOR:  If only we could return each animal to its natural home.
To eat and roam in freedom,
To live as designed,
With fear from natural predators,
And with contentment from natural surroundings.
But the natural surroundings are changing
Through people’s involvement.
And the natural surroundings are threatened
As are the animals’ lives.
To live enclosed is to live partially
But to live enclosed means remaining alive.
Zoos are a way of righting the wrongs.
The more we support them,
The more they can support the animals.
Please…support humane zoos.

If you would like to understand how animals in a zoo really feel, read Zoo Conversations:

zoo conversations

“Zoo Conversations—Giving Voices to the Animals, A Play” has been published!

 

 

zoo conversations

I am pleased to announce that “Zoo Conversations” has been published on amazon.com. In this short play, the lives of ten animals living in a zoo are explored, as well as the frustrations of the dedicated people working at zoos. “Zoo Conversations” is a play for young and old. It brings to light the challenges for those who care for the animals and the challenges for the animals themselves.

Here is the Shetland Pony’s tale:

The Shetland Pony

(The Shetland pony sticks out a leg where it can be seen, then draws it back. She peeks out and then hides. She walks in a big circle around the spotlight and then stands just out of the spotlight, but looking at the audience.)

SHETLAND PONY:  The food is here, right? Staying away is better for me, but I want to eat. I will talk to you, but only if you feed me. I prefer to be with my type and not with the animals that put heavy things on me and pull me.

I like to do things at my speed, fast or slow depending on how I feel. I feel different speeds when I am tired or hungry or with others.

When I am with others like me, I am as I should be. I run and I jump and I do what the others like me do. I am sure when I am with others like me.

I am not as I should be when the other animals put me in a place by myself. Why do they put me by myself? I am slow when I am by myself. When I am with the others, I am fast and comfortable. When I am with the others, I am sure.

Many animals sit on me. Sometimes, the animals that sit on me give me food. I like when they give me food. Some of the animals that sit on me are quiet and touch me with softness. I like them.

Some of the animals that sit on me are loud and pulling. I move away from them when I can. The animals that pull are not wanted. I am slow with them because they have strength and ropes.

(Pause)

The food is for me, right? I will eat it now.

(The Shetland pony enters the spotlight where the trough of food is located, lowers her head into the trough and eats. She then turns around, without looking at the audience, and walks out.)

Cecil the Lion—Significance of His Death

Cecil the lion

As I read the various news stories about the death of Cecil, the lion from the Zimbabwe National Park, I felt confused about his significance, and so I turn to Spiritual Presence to guide me. Here is what I learn:

The killing of animals is, in general, considered to be fine by most humans. Humans use animals for food, clothing, and decorative items. In addition, animals are used for their healing properties and in testing of drugs and other items used by humans. The animals that are approved for killing differ from country to country and from region to region. For example, in the United States the killing of dogs is a crime in some states. In India, the killing of cows is a crime in some states.

Lions are treasured and feared. When humans fear for their lives, they justify the killing of lions. When the lions are endangered in a region, they are protected by humans—unless a lion is threatening the life of a human.

Cecil the lion lived in a protected area in a country where humans benefit monetarily from the killing of lions. His value to his own lion family was large. His value to hunters was significant for a short time. His value to the people who arranged his killing was significant for the families of these people.

Selective caring for the welfare of animals is a fact. Some people care more about the welfare of certain animals than others. This caring is generally a cultural trait.

The best way to protect animals is to unwant them for status symbols and fashion statements. Unwanting the animals would stop local people from providing their dead carcasses.

Unfortunately, many humans are uninterested in caring for animals in their natural habitats.  Because of this fact, the significance of humane zoos cannot be stressed enough.

If Cecil the lion had been in a humane zoo, he would not have been killed by a hunter. His living conditions would have been stunted, but he would have lived out his life. Living in a natural habitat gave him thirteen years of free, lion living.

Perhaps if humans remembered that they are animals too, they would care better for their brethren.

Ambling at the zoo

Giraffes

While in LA, I had the opportunity to amble at the LA Zoo & Botanical Gardens.

This zoo is lush with vegetation. The atmosphere from the luscious greenery fills the zoo with a sense of growth and protection. The gardens cause visitors to walk a bit more slowly and to breathe a bit more deeply.

The zoo is a humane zoo that cares for its residents in an obviously protective manner. The animals have “homes” that suit them in landscaping, but not in size. Of course, the animals would be better off in their natural habitats, but the natural habitats are often unsafe for them because of people-inflicted damage. The zoo strives to create a normal living space for each animal, and in most cases, succeeds. The animals are content, and so the zoo is focused in the right direction.

The atmosphere at the zoo influences the attendees. These visitors become less me-focused and more other-aware as they move from animal home to animal home. In general, the atmosphere among the visitors is one of friendliness and camaraderie.

Kudos to the LA Zoo!

Ambling at the Zoo

Seeing the zoo requires
kindness
feelings
curiosity
patience
empathy
desire to connect.

Animal viewing
Animal antics
Animal entertainment

Ambling at the zoo
is the way to see the zoo.

From here to there,
skipping is allowed.

Desire to connect
brings connection to self.

Feeling the animals’ energy
adds energy to the observer.

I + Them = energy

See the animals and be amazed!

This poem is from the upcoming book of poetry named “Unfolding”.

Clarifications about the basic tests for maintaining health, Test #1

 

 

treble_staff.extended

I was asked for more information about the test questions that were presented in the previous post.  I am reposting with more information.

Test #1: Sensitivity to environmental concerns

The state of the environment directly affects the health of people. People who live in a highly polluted and vegetation-free environment are subjected to damage that can cause physical ailments, but also can cause damage to the soul. People who live in a vegetation-rich area, but are careless in their relationship to their environment, can suffer from damage to their physical and soulful selves too.

Disregard for plant life, water sources, and conditions for animal rearing undermines the grounding of the world and damages physical and intellectual health. Knowingly contributing to abuse of fauna and flora damages people—body and soul.

Here are the questions for the basic test:

  1. Recycle? Yes/No/Partially
  2. Use water judiciously? Yes/No/Sometimes
  3. Use chemical agents for cleaning or insect infestations? Yes/No/Only for insect infestations/Only for cleaning
  4. Support conservation efforts and interested in well-being of trees and plants? Yes/No
    (explanation: being aware of and actively participating in maintenance of local and distant environments. For example, contributing money to and/or volunteering with organizations that maintain and protect the environment [local arboretums, global or national environmental organizations, picking up trash in a littered part of the city, local environmental advocacy groups])
  5. Care about animal welfare? Yes, including the animals that I eat/Yes, I care about my pet/Yes, except for animals who disturb my garden/No/Sometimes
    (explanation: animal welfare is broad and can be overwhelming. It includes awareness about conditions at places that raise animals for food [industrial meat, egg, and dairy industries], raise animals for our enjoyment [puppy mills, fur farms], zoos [humane or not], importation of endangered animals and birds.)

There are additional questions; however, these five are a good beginning. Consider your answers and then consider the meaning of each question.

Being sensitive to the environment is good for your health!

Post 94-nature

The basic tests for maintaining health, Test #1

treble_staff

The previous post “Monitoring Health” (https://energy-guidance-complete.com/2014/08/24/monitoring-health/) brings awareness of the tests that should be performed in order to evaluate health.

Here is Test #1.

Test #1: Sensitivity to environmental concerns

The state of the environment directly affects the health of people. People who live in a highly polluted and vegetation-free environment are subjected to damage that can cause physical ailments, but also can cause damage to the soul. People who live in a vegetation-rich area, but are careless in their relationship to their environment, can suffer from damage to their physical and soulful selves too.

Disregard for plant life, water sources, and conditions for animal rearing undermines the grounding of the world and damages physical and intellectual health. Knowingly contributing to abuse of fauna and flora damages people—body and soul.

Here are the questions for the basic test:

  1. Recycle? Yes/No/Partially
  2. Use water judiciously? Yes/No/Sometimes
  3. Use chemical agents for cleaning or insect infestations? Yes/No/Only for insect infestations/Only for cleaning
  4. Support conservation efforts and interested in well-being of trees and plants? Yes/No
  5. Care about animal welfare? Yes, including the animals that I eat/Yes, I care about my pet/Yes, except for animals who disturb my garden/No/Sometimes

There are additional questions; however, these five are a good beginning. Consider your answers and then consider the meaning of each question.

Being sensitive to the environment is good for your health!

Post 94-nature

Nature’s impact on us

Gift of nature

Want a fantastic treat? Try spending more time in nature.

Many of us tend to trivialize the importance of our encounters with the environment and with other living creatures. Besides the enjoyment that can come from being in nature:

 “The connection to flora and fauna significantly 1) broadens and heightens understanding of cycles and fluctuations; 2) develops appreciative and inquisitive capabilities; and 3) causes people to examine and work with vegetation that aid human life and animals that enhance human existence.” – from “Oneself-Living”

When the weather is hot, many people look for cool retreats. Instead of heading to the mall with its over-air-conditioned assault on the body, find a shaded walk with broad trees, chirping birds, and bountiful vegetation.  The air conditioning overtaxes the body (even if you think it feels good), but the outside temperature strengthens the body (even if you feel sweaty).

Being outside in nature is relaxing, invigorating, and mesmerizing. There are “rules” for feeling relaxed, invigorated, and mesmerized when you are walking in nature:

  1. Have sufficient water so that you stay hydrated.
  2. Wear a hat and clothing that protect from too strong sun. Sun screen is important.
  3. Keep your mobile phone in a bag and not in your hand or pocket. The less you use it or think about it, the more you can enjoy your outdoor experience.
  4. Pay attention to the things that draw your eye. You will gain understanding about yourself and your soul when you recognize natural draws of your attention.

There are magical moments that only occur in the out-of-doors near the trees and vegetation,  really!!

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