A Balanced Approach to Wellness!

Archive for the ‘People’ Category

Communication in all its forms

Post 22-meetrings

Some communication is verbal, some is visual, some is direct, some is implied, and some is internal.

Internal communication

The internal communication is the conversation within a person’s body, when the body is notifying the person about its needs or situation. Internal communication influences all the other types of communication, because it influences people’s actions and reactions.

Ignoring internal communication can lead to illness, suffering, and poor choices.

Implied communication

Implied communication requires interest and interpretation. Cues have to be noticed and deciphered. Usually implied communication is easily missed and misunderstood.

An example of misunderstood communication is a baby crying because his feet are cramped, and the parent tries many ways to stop the crying, but doesn’t know to adjust the baby’s socks. An example of missed communication is a teenager staying silent about feelings of sadness, but exhibiting overly helpful or overly apathetic behavior, and the parent doesn’t realize the cause.

Direct communication

Direct communication is natural for babies, animals living in nature, and people who have physical impediments that restrict societally sanctioned behavior. Direct communication is truth through words or actions that is true for the person communicating them. These communications are not censored or filtered.

Direct communication is hard for people who have been conditioned to fit into society; in other words, most people above the age of 24 months have learned to filter or censor their words and actions.

Visual communication

Visual communication is through expressions and movements. Sight is not necessary for visual communication to occur, because it can be felt through touch and sound. Visual communication is often more direct than spoken communication. Children who have not been repressed visually communicate their truth until the point where societal training overrides their faith in their own judgment.

Visual communication is often more powerful than spoken communication, because it is usually more truthful.

Verbal communication

Of all the types of communications, verbal is the least reliable. It often contains manipulations, falsehoods, and assumptions. Societal training leads to these forced communication behaviors. People are trained to suppress their innate inclinations, so that they learn to talk about things that hold little meaning for them.

Verbal communication is a wonderful connector when it is used wisely. Words that are spoken with sincerity uplift the speaker, although they can be difficult to receive when the listener has an opposing conviction.

Communication within caste systems

Societal structure limits honest discourse. Societies with “caste” systems in social relationships, business structures, and civic management encourage verbal discourse that is guarded and condescending. In these structure arrangements, not all members of a “superior” group expect others to be guarded in their speech around them. This behavior is correct.

The message from spirit

Communication can be uplifting and positive when it is offered and received from a place of kindness. Even internal communication with the body can be kind.

Note: This information has been spiritually received.

EGC sessions with God: Annoying interactions

annoying family

People are programmed to be themselves. Each person has a pace at which he or she is comfortable, interests that are beckoning and fulfilling, abilities to do certain things with ease, and a definite sense of justice that is individualized. No two people are the same—not even identical twins.

With all the differences in pace, interests, abilities and sense of justice, people will naturally see the world differently. This division in behavior and personality carries the possibility for endless fascination about others. It also carries the possibility for endless opportunities to be annoyed. Seeing others as fascinating or annoying is a choice.

Within families, opportunities for amazement and fascination abound. Unfortunately, many people don’t recognize these opportunities and become annoyed and want their family members to be like them.

The mother whose pace is quick expects her children to be quick too, but they might have been soulfully given slower paces. If she doesn’t recognize their different paces as acceptable, she will be annoyed and push them to be different. Depending on her insistence, her children can become anxious to please her while being unable to keep her pace or overcompensate and lose touch with their true natures. They, in turn, may become annoyed at slow people, when in actuality, they themselves are naturally slower in actions.

The father, who is fascinated by competition and thrives in competitive work environments and competitions, could be annoyed at his wife and children if their natures do not embrace competition. He can push them to be like him, and push them away or cause them to be anxious or overly competitive. His annoyance will influence their opinions of themselves and of others.

Expecting people to be like you is an unrealistic expectation. It sets you up to be constantly annoyed, and if you have influence over others, it sets them up to be constantly annoyed at you or at themselves or at others. For people who choose to be annoyed, interactions will be constantly annoying, and daily life will be filled with unhappiness and disappointment.

God pushed me to write about this topic, because annoyance is wasted energy that creates negativity and destruction.

Our world deserves better. The more we accept each other’s differences, the more we create balance and peacefulness.

ECG sessions with God: Is state-sponsored killing (capital punishment) good for the citizens?

Post 92-spiritual connection

Today’s issue is addressed in the book “Descending into War, Descending into Contempt”. Here is God’s wisdom about capital punishment:

Capital punishment is a payment that should never be extracted. No matter what another person did, capital punishment is not for people to use. Death that is deliberately meted out is improper for people to do. It creates imbalance in the people who cause it to happen—in the judges, in the juries, in the officials overseeing the event, and in the general populace.

Capital punishment has emotional side effects for the people who administer it, not for the people who receive it. Yes, those who die because of capital punishment have fears and other emotions. The side effects they don’t feel are indifference, hardening, and stonyheartedness. Yes, they may have been indifferent, hardened or stonyhearted, which allowed them to commit offenses deemed worthy of death, but their mental state before execution contracts.

The feelings of the people who participate in government-sanctioned executions, from the people who administer the deaths to the people who voted for its use, are indifferent to the enormity of purposefully administered death, are hardened to changes that have happened to them because of their indifference, and have become stonyhearted—desensitized, remorseless, and indurate [physically and morally hardened]. The full extent of capital punishment effects are not understood, but they are wide and rippling.

Judging others is appropriate. Confining some who cannot control their misanthropic behavior is prudent. Insisting upon restitution is instructional. Bringing society towards helping the offenders before they hurt others is wise. Allowing capital punishment is misguided.

 

EGC sessions with God: Refugees

welcoming refugees

The issue of refugees is on people’s minds. Here’s what God has to say about refugees:

Moving from one place to another is a difficult transition. Moving by choice is filled with emotions of apprehension, sorrow, and hope. Moving under duress is sometimes frightening and often debilitating.

When the duress is expected, moving can be like moving by choice: filled with emotions of apprehension, sorrow, and hope. When the duress is sudden—caused by natural changes (like floods and earthquakes) or caused by other people—the force of the event forever affects the people who must move on, and these people require sympathy from others to adjust to their new reality.

A refugee is a person who has lost connection with family or societal identity. Even a person who chooses to move to a new area or country can be filled with anxiety and fear, like the anxiety and fear felt by a person who moves under duress. What matters is how they are received in their new places of residence.

Refugees deserve to be welcomed to their new places of residence, even if the places are temporary. People are people no matter their characteristics, and both sides—the refugees and the settled people—deserve kindness. Refugees must release deeply held attitudes and customs. Settled people must willingly offer assistance and guidance with the ways of their society, without being superior or condescending. The process of accepting one another is steeped in willingness to learn and accept.

Refugees are natural results of the changing world. Their lives are equal. No one is better than them.

Investing for a rainy day, the good and bad news

This blog post is not about investing money. It is about investing in what’s around you—in friendships, in committed relationships, in neighborly relations, in family, and in the community. Investing in these important relationships is investing for a rainy day at its best!

Good News: Investing in family, friends and community builds a safety net

“Investing in friendships and giving and taking from friends is nourishing. Investing in relationships is natural and is needed to live a balanced life. Investing in family—children, children’s children, siblings, cousins, and so on builds a network of support that is reliable. Investing in communal activities builds a network of support that nourishes and strengthens the individual community members and the collective group.”… from “Oneself—Living”.

Investing time is necessary in order to build a safety net for when life becomes difficult or too hard to bear alone. Often, people put work obligations before obligations to family, friends, and community. This behavior has become acceptable in society, but it is short-sighted. The more a person gives to the relationships that truly matter, the more protection from the surprises that occur in life. Of course, a person must perform work obligations with an enthusiastic spirit and with focus, but work obligations should be one section of life, not all of life.

 Good News: Investing in family, friends and community supports good health

The more people invest in their relationships and community, the more balanced their health. Time spent with people who are meaningful creates memories that enrich beyond the moments in which they occurred. Positive memories are better, but even negative memories create experiences that build and nurture if the negative experiences are within the realm of realistic disagreeable treatment. In other words, interactions with family members, friends, and community acquaintances do not always have to be positive for the investment to be worthwhile. Learning to negotiate the varying needs of the various people is balancing.

Tip:

Choose a community betterment activity that excites you so you’ll want to participate. If you enjoy the arts, volunteer at a museum or in an enhancing-the-neighborhood project. If you prefer working on your own, volunteer with community building or cleaning projects. There are enough volunteer opportunities to suit all personalities.

 Bad News: Not investing is unwise

“Non-investment in relationships with others leads to loneliness, sadness, aloofness, insensitivity, and unsureness. Non-investment in friendship—foolish. Non-investment in marriage—incorrect behavior. Non-investment in intrafamilial connections—mistake. Non-investment in neighborly relations—short-sighted. Non-investment in societal obligations—selfish thinking.”… from “Oneself—Living”.

The less people invest in their relationships and community, the less balanced their health. Simple as that.

Conclusion

Investing for a rainy day means being prepared for whatever may come. Rain is not negative, but it can cause a change in plans. The same is true for changes in health, family structure (through births, deaths, divorce, etc.), and societal balance. Being prepared means planning ahead—making sure to invest in the connections that truly matter.

To purchase the book Oneself-Living, click on the book cover: 

Individual:Group:Self-Reflection

People see. They see what others are doing and do the same—or  not. What they observe in others causes them to adjust their own behavior. People are always adjusting, and self-reflection is the vehicle to the adjusting.

Self-reflection has several meanings. It means seeing an image of oneself in others. It means reflecting back to others their humanness. Reflecting back and forth actions, ideas, and emotions, sometimes with thoughtful reflection and sometimes just reflection.

People are individuals, but group members too, and they reflect on themselves varyingly. The varying self-reflection is dependent upon age, society, and awareness of the soul.

Self-reflection of children

People start life through exploration of themselves and their close companions. The sense of self—one’s boundaries and one’s impact on the environment and others—thoroughly entrances and busies the infant, and leads to understanding of self and others. As the infant gains awareness of caregivers, unknown people, and animals, self-reflection begins. Comparing oneself to others, as a tool to learning how to be, is natural development. When the behavior of others is admirable, the child learns to depend on others, to desire their company, and to identify with them.

Self-reflection of sufferers

When the behavior of others is unkind, indifferent, or impatient, children’s development is affected. They lose their desire to connect with others when the negative reflections are internalized. Children naturally reflect what they learn from their caregivers, except when childlike wonder and happiness prevail. Caregivers who are difficult influence opinions of self and of the community. Close companions negatively influence when they model unkind behavior. Community members and other people negatively influence when they model unkind and unaccepting behavior.

Each person is a reflection of others’ behavior so that the suffering of one reflects over and over as others internalize and reflect the suffering back.

Relationship reflectors

Relationship reflectors are the people in a relationship. People are highly influenced by lovers, close friends, and siblings. They continuously serve-return-volley to one another when the relationship is close. Relationships nurture and balance, and they are required for well-being.

True Reflection

Each person has a soul that provides a personality, likes and dislikes, emotional reactions, and connection to energy from beyond. When the soul is able to influence actions, the person is reflecting soulful definitions.

Living that is true to oneself is self-reflection realized. Living that is true to oneself is expected. Living one’s capabilities and gifts, as an individual and as part of the group, sustains. Individual:group:self-reflection—the meeting point for the soul!

Built to feel superior, internally and by others

Superiority is a learned behavior.

A child is self-interested, because he has his own concerns that consume his attention. This behavior is inborn. The child focuses on himself, not from a sense of superiority, but from the need to survive.

The child encounters others with curiosity, joy, and fear. When a caregiver over-elevates the child’s sense of himself, encounters with others have lessened curiosity, joy, and fear and more expectations of subservience (by the others).

Internal sense of superiority develops from a young age and can be based on gender, race, physical appearance, and attitude. Later comes superiority based on social standing, intelligence, and financial status. Subservient behavior by others and athletic prowess can increase the sense of superiority.

Feeling superior can be intricate, based on all the causes set out above, or it can be single-cause—no matter, the sense of superiority is there. It affects all relationships and all interactions.

Societal sense of superiority, like individual sense of superiority, is learned. The entire society can feel superior, as in an overinflated opinion of race or nationality or it can be bestowed upon members of society who are treated “better” because of gender, physical appearance, financial power, athletic prowess, and other factors (like fashion sense or musical/artistic abilities).

Superiority infuses society with discontent and entitlement. Superiority brings envy and distancing. Each individual builds the societal sense of superiority with internal feelings of being better than or by accepting the societal definitions of superior race or gender or subservient expectations.

Superiority is a learned behavior. It is not innate.

Not all people feel superior nor do they accept societal divisions of superiority. These people are living in a constructive and balanced way. Their example is worth following.

This message is from Spirit. If you act superior to others, your behavior is wrong. Accept differences and release arrogance.

Spirit gives more wisdom about harmful superiority thinking in these posts:

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