A Balanced Approach to Wellness

Archive for the ‘Heart’ Category

The heart’s lament—Heart #1

Sad heart

“I’m working as hard as I can, but it’s getting harder and harder for me to move the oxygen. I can still handle the lymphatic fluid with ease, but the oxygen is tiring me.

My carrying source [the person whose heart is speaking] is tired and refuses to stop working when I and the other members [the organs and systems in the body] indicate that we need to slow down. We push for our carrying source to sleep, but we are ignored night after night.

I feel shaking. Other members send shaking feelings and they cause me to shake too. The shaking sends me feelings of tightness and I pull myself in to slow the shaking. My tightness slows my work with the oxygen and even with the carbon dioxide. Back and forth my work goes—with strength and then with shaking, and I need the sleep to recalibrate.

When my flow source [the veins] feel weak, I work harder to support my carrying source. When my flow subjects [the arteries] feel blocked, I am forced to pause. The pausing is unfamiliar. It affects me and the other members, and makes us sluggish or pained. The pausing is not good.”

The heart that is “speaking” its lament is the heart of a woman who is 46 years old. She is 20 lbs/9.1 kg overweight, exercises once a week, eats too little whole foods, drinks too many soft drinks, smokes cigarettes sporadically, and sleeps less than 6 ½ hours a night.

Her time is divided between a full-time job, her family (husband, a teenager, a child who is an out-of-work college graduate, one parent, and two siblings), and studying once a week. She makes time for cooking once a week, meeting friends once every three or four weeks, and getting out in nature once every six weeks. Her outlook is influenced by self-criticism and self-doubt.

Her heart consistently supports her occasional bouts of excessive exercise and excessive eating. Her heart is in need of regular mealtimes, more enjoyment with friends and family, more time in nature and in movement, and seven hours of sleep a night. Her heart needs her care and protection.

Note: This information has been spiritually provided. It has not been medically proven.

Healing the heart from stress

heart on the beach

Scientific studies have proven that stress hurts the heart. Spirit has advice to counter the effects of stress on your heart.

Breathing

  • As much as possible, breathe deeply. The more deeply you breathe, the more open your veins stay.
  • If you’re having trouble breathing through your nose, remain unstressed about this breathing situation. The body is designed to inhale and exhale through the nostrils—sometimes through both simultaneously and sometimes alternatingly. Feeling stress when one nostril seems to be closed is stress misplaced. The body will balance the breathing, unless excessive amounts of mucus are being created because of a cold, allergic reaction, or reaction to medication. In these cases, slowed breathing through the nostrils or mouth will sustain the body.
  • If you are feeling stressed, heart breathing can help: as you inhale, think of the breath coming in and surrounding your heart with care and protection. As you exhale, let the escaping breath leave your body carrying out unwanted thoughts. Heart breathing is strengthening and repairing.

Activities

  • Movement can release stressful forces on the heart. Simple movement, such as wiggling the fingers or gently moving the head in different directions and angles, are minimal movements that lighten stress. Walking in nature or engaging in an enjoyed sport can be more helpful.
  • Listening to music that relaxes lowers stress.
  • Interacting with animals lowers stress and opens the arteries.
  • Smiling relaxes the lungs, which then invigorate the heart. Smiling releases stress.

Involvement in society

  • Showing gratitude to others—on a regular basis—helps  the heart stay strong against stress.
  • Meeting with people who are not stress-inducing—on a regular basis—helps the heart stay resilient against stress.
  • Listening to others and empathizing with them helps the heart be pliable.

The heart and stress

The impact of stress on the heart cannot be studied easily, because of stress’s impact on the other organs and systems in the body. Our bodies are holistic entities that cannot be separated into parts without sacrificing the reality of interconnectedness.

All the tips presented in this blog post have impact throughout the body. They are worthwhile to pursue for well-being and balance. More can be done for well-being and balance, but doing these suggestions is a way to begin.

Note: This information has been spiritually received.

Depression and the heart

broken heart

When a person feels depressed, clinically or not, the heart is affected. Moods are felt in the heart, physically and intangibly, so that uplifting feelings aid the heart’s restorative abilities and depressed feelings cause the heart to work more frenziedly.

Depression causes the heart to lose control of emotional restraint. Emotional reactions will be exaggerated or inappropriate. The emotional reactions can also be unavailable: the depressed person can’t tap into them, because the effort to access them is too demanding. When emotional reactions cannot be accessed, the depression is overtaking reason and is further forcing the heart to overwork itself.

There are many reasons to overcome depression, and heart health is one of them.

Note: This information was spiritually received.

Why focus on the heart?

Post 17-loiving self

For a while now, I’ve been receiving spiritual information about the heart. The reasons are partly general and partly personal.

In general, understanding the heart and its physical and intangible aspects is worthwhile. The more we know about the heart, the more we can care for our own hearts. And of course, the more we care for our own hearts, the better our health will be.

The personal aspect of the heart information is in the way in which I receive it. Since 2012 when I began to receive spiritual wisdom, I have communicated with Spirit through kinesiology muscle testing. I feel a direction and then ask questions, receiving Yes or No answers through my fingers. I then build the information word by word. The questioning takes time and requires my patience and willingness to explore many avenues before receiving the wisdom.

I still receive spiritual wisdom through the questioning, but now I also receive it through my heart. I “breathe” into my heart and then the spiritual information enters my head. I feel the direction and the words as ideas and phrases, and the information flows more easily.

The heart breathing requires my intention and my openness to receive. It requires my trust and my willingness to flow with the information transfer.

The sharing of heart wisdom has been for you and for me. Together, we have explored many aspects of the heart, while I have been learning to “hear” the wisdom through my own heart. I hope you are finding this journey to heart awareness enriching and empowering. I haven’t yet finished with the heart topics, but this seems a good time to pause and share my journey. If you’d like to know more about my connection to the spiritual wisdom, write me a comment below.

Here’s to heart exploration!!

“The heart wants what it wants”

Hearts-anniversary

A famous person has used this idea to justify inappropriate coupling. Another famous person has used this excuse to justify staying in a destructive relationship. This statement has been used to avoid loving someone and to hurt someone else. It is a catch-all phrase that often relinquishes responsibility for behavior that is un-heart related.

The heart, in its intuitive wisdom, guides towards relationships that are uplifting. Hormones and the eyes can override the heart’s wisdom. Fear and aloneness can block the wisdom. Societal constraints and prejudices also add to the mix that cancels the connection to the heart’s wisdom.

When a person chooses a relationship that is not uplifting and says the choice came from the heart, know that the heart was not involved in the choice. The heart would not intentionally hurt or misdirect.

What does the heart want? The heart wants understanding.

Note: This post is from Spirit, as are all the heart posts.

How broken is a broken heart?

broken heart

Can a person actually die from a broken heart? Is a broken heart a valid reason to write as the cause of death on a death certificate? Just how broken is a broken heart?

We explored the concept of a broken heart in the post “Heartache is holistic response”. In that post, Spirit shared “Our hearts break when loved ones die or when love is unrequited or when once-in-love is no more.” The post then goes on to discuss healing through turning inwards and listening to the body’s guidance towards healing.

Now Spirit wants us to understand the intensity of a broken heart.

The answers to the three questions are #1 No, #2 Yes, if emotional causes can be listed, and #3 Ceaselessly. A broken heart always leaves scars, some tangible, some emotional.

It appears that the answers to #1 and #2 contradict one another. They are actually the same answer!

A broken heart, no matter the causes, takes time to damage the body. The damage can lead to death, but it’s the damaged body that yields to death, not the broken heart. So the answer to question #1 is No. In cases where a person takes his or her own life because of a broken heart, the agent of death—gun, chemical substance, action—might be selected as the cause of death, but the actual cause is the broken heart that led to giving up on life. So the answer to #2 is Yes.

Question #3, “Just how broken is a broken heart?”, surprises with its eternal answer. Ceaselessly, the broken heart influences future actions and thoughts. Even a broken heart that occurred so many years ago sways the thoughts and actions. We are the sum of our experiences, and the broken heart—healed or not—is a variable in the ongoing equation that expresses each of our lives. The broken heart that has been “healed” influences less than the festering broken heart, yet it still brings influence.

The heart is meant to be broken and healed, because true relationships shift the heart. The heart—the tangible heart and the intangible heart—the duo that govern our lives—is designed to be broken. And the body is designed to heal it!

Note: I continue to receive spiritual wisdom through my heart connection with Spirit!

When the heart feels abandoned

Post 111 Life is struggle

Abandonment of the heart can be physical and emotional. Ignoring the heart’s calls for help when it physically hurts is physical abandonment. Ignoring the heart’s need for connections is emotional abandonment.

Physical abandonment can be felt more immediately, and ignored calls for attention can lead to impairment of heart function. Physical abandonment can also lead to extended impairment throughout the body.

Emotional abandonment is less immediately noticeable, but it afflicts the body over time if relationships are not nourished. Emotional abandonment is serious, but less ominous.

Physical impairment of the heart can come from improper care of the body, emotional turmoil that is excessive, or genetic weakness:

  • Less can be done about genetic weakness; however, genetic weakness does not condemn a person to heart troubles. An emotionally strong heart can triumph over genetic predisposition to heart troubles.
  • Emotional turmoil that is excessive strains the heart’s functioning. Heartache that leads to depression or restrained emotional connections can cause impairment. Overly excited outbursts of emotion—positive or negative—can disturb heart function over time and lead to weakening the heart’s rhythmic beating.
  • Improper care of the body that leads to impairment of the heart is described in the blog posts “Heart attack secrets” and “Things that harm the heart”.

Physical abandonment of the heart is usually done without understanding that our actions create havoc in our bodies. Choosing to care for the heart involves rethinking choices and habits.

Emotional impairment of the heart can develop because of hurts experienced as a child or young adult, by heartache that is too profound, and by religious teachings that extol martyrdom. Emotional abandonment of the heart is as serious as physical abandonment, but its marks on the body are less pronounced. Its marks are mainly on society and family.

Whether abandonment of the heart is physical or emotional is less important that the fact that the heart can be abandoned. Abandonment of the heart is a sad thing that is reversible and worth fixing.

Note: This post was delivered to me through my heart’s connection to Spirit. Heart pain is worth checking with a medical doctor when it is continuous.

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