A Balanced Approach to Wellness!

Posts tagged ‘heart health’

Congestion of the heart

heart-drugged

The heart is congested when the body is full of heartache. Heartache comes from unrequited love, unfulfilled dreams, loneliness, blocked arteries, and hunger for nutrition.

Unrequited love can be present in and out of relationships. A committed relationship does not guarantee that the heart is receiving its share of love. A heart requires loving relationships that pump it full of emotional sustenance. When relationships lack surety of love, the emotional sustenance is reduced and the heart is susceptible to illness.

Unfulfilled dreams cause narrowing throughout the body: narrowing of passageways, messaging, and performance. Unfulfilled dreams open to illness and disease, and enable congestion to enter the heart.

Loneliness has direct dialogue with the heart. It harms the heart through sad thoughts and empty conversations.

Blocked arteries cause physical symptoms that are operable. Unblocking the arteries can clear congestion in the heart, but the congestion can return when the causes of the artery blockage are not lifted. Artery blockage is related to food intake, oxygen sufficiency, and sleep deprivation.

Hunger for nutrition is tricky. The heart hungers for food sources that are rich in nutritional goodness. The heart hungers for regular reinforcements of energy to keep the beat. The heart hungers for just enough and not too much. The heart hungers for relaxed ingestion. And the heart hungers for love.

An uncongested heart requires heartfelt relationships, a life lived authentically, companionship, nutritional reliability, rhythm in activities, and rhythm in nature.

Note: This information comes from my heartfelt connection with Spirit.

 

The heart on a flight

heart-best friend

When we fly, our hearts fly with us.

People who are nervous when they fly cause their hearts to contract. People who are excited when they fly cause their hearts to beat faster. People who are angry when they fly cause their hearts to contract and beat faster.

People who are hungry when they fly cause their hearts to work harder. People who are thirsty when they fly cause their hearts to contract and work harder.

People who are constipated when they fly cause their hearts to feel tightness or feel antsy. People who are ill when they fly cause their hearts to feel tightness or stress or pain or spasms, depending on the source of the illness (flying when ill is hard for the body).

The best way to fly for the heart is when a smile comes easily, when excitement is tempered, and when overall health is reasonably well.

Notes

  • This blog post is a reflection of my heart’s connection to God.
  • Tuning into your heart’s wisdom is a step towards spiritual connection.

When the Appendix prods the Heart

heart-angry

The appendix, one of the most misunderstood organs, is responsible for initiating many defensive actions in the body. Its connection to the heart is through prompting the heart to speed up when blood flow is sluggish and to slow down when wounds compromise life force (because too much blood is being lost to sustain life).

The appendix and the heart generally function independently of one another. Their tasks are complementary, yet separate. Only when blood flow is compromised does the appendix initiate heart-related activity.

For people whose appendixes have been removed, these activities are not transferred to other organs or systems in the body (unlike other healing activities that are transferred, as mentioned in the post “How does the body heal when the appendix is removed?”).

Note: This information has been spiritually, not scientifically, received.

Heart Happiness

Post 27-striving

Here are things that make the heart “happy”:

  • Sensations of love!
  • Frolicking in nature!
  • Sensations from deep breathing
  • Hugs from loved ones!
  • Sustenance (food and water) that is nourishing
  • Attention from an animal!
  • Relaxed pumping speed and increases in pumping speed
    (changing the pumping speed can keep the heart conditioned, when the heart is not stressed)
  • Digestive happiness: eating nourishing foods that make the internal body feel good, (already mentioned), taking care of elimination needs as soon as they arise, and handling emotional issues that are felt in the digestive organs
  • Immersion in focused concentration on beloved endeavors
  • Smiles and laughter that emanate from feelings of joy!
  • Rhythmic movements and making music!
  • No self-criticism!!

Note: this information has been spiritually received. I think it’s amazing! What about you??

The hearts’ laments—Hearts #3 & 4

heart-drugged

Heart #3:

“My work is usually routine, but occasionally something happens—my carrying source [the person whose heart is speaking] does something that makes me shiver and shake, and all my work feels very hard to do.”

heart-drugged 2

Heart #4:

“I used to feel strong, but now I feel unable to be normal.”

The first heart that is “speaking” its lament is the heart of a woman in her twenties who uses cocaine on weekends. The second heart that is speaking its lament is the heart of an eight-year-old boy who is given Ritalin.

Cocaine and Ritalin—two substances that irregulate the heart.

Note: This information has been spiritually received. Take note that the hearts are telling their truth here.  Parents should especially pay attention.

Note: This information was not scientifically received.

The heart’s lament—Heart #2

heart-angry

“My carrying source [the person whose heart is speaking] has smoked for many, many years. My oxygen supply is weak. My carrying source is worrying much of the time. My desire for understanding is weakened.” [Oxygen is a physical requirement of the heart; being understood by other people is an intangible requirement of the heart.]

“My work is hard to accomplish.”

The heart that is “speaking” its lament is the heart of a man who is 63 years old. His days consist of 1½ packs of cigarettes, too much coffee and too little water, too many hours focused on the problems in his business and too few hours in enjoyment with family and friends, and infrequent walks in nature.

He has faced health challenges, including a mild heart attack, and his family worries for his health. His heart struggles to support his life.

This heart is in need of more oxygen and more relaxation. It needs smoke-free living and walks outside breathing fresh air, more water and less coffee, quality time with friends and family, and less tension from worry. His heart needs his care and protection.

 Note: This information has been spiritually provided. It has not been medically proven.

The heart’s lament—Heart #1

Sad heart

“I’m working as hard as I can, but it’s getting harder and harder for me to move the oxygen. I can still handle the lymphatic fluid with ease, but the oxygen is tiring me.

My carrying source [the person whose heart is speaking] is tired and refuses to stop working when I and the other members [the organs and systems in the body] indicate that we need to slow down. We push for our carrying source to sleep, but we are ignored night after night.

I feel shaking. Other members send shaking feelings and they cause me to shake too. The shaking sends me feelings of tightness and I pull myself in to slow the shaking. My tightness slows my work with the oxygen and even with the carbon dioxide. Back and forth my work goes—with strength and then with shaking, and I need the sleep to recalibrate.

When my flow source [the veins] feel weak, I work harder to support my carrying source. When my flow subjects [the arteries] feel blocked, I am forced to pause. The pausing is unfamiliar. It affects me and the other members, and makes us sluggish or pained. The pausing is not good.”

The heart that is “speaking” its lament is the heart of a woman who is 46 years old. She is 20 lbs/9.1 kg overweight, exercises once a week, eats too little whole foods, drinks too many soft drinks, smokes cigarettes sporadically, and sleeps less than 6 ½ hours a night.

Her time is divided between a full-time job, her family (husband, a teenager, a child who is an out-of-work college graduate, one parent, and two siblings), and studying once a week. She makes time for cooking once a week, meeting friends once every three or four weeks, and getting out in nature once every six weeks. Her outlook is influenced by self-criticism and self-doubt.

Her heart consistently supports her occasional bouts of excessive exercise and excessive eating. Her heart is in need of regular mealtimes, more enjoyment with friends and family, more time in nature and in movement, and seven hours of sleep a night. Her heart needs her care and protection.

Note: This information has been spiritually provided. It has not been medically proven.

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