A Balanced Approach to Wellness!

Posts tagged ‘aging’

The Rhythms of the Heart

Heart Musical Notes

Smoothly, the heart beats a rhythm that pounds out life. Beat after beat, the quiet pounding paves the way for a life lived. As the pounding progresses through the years, its rhythm expresses the reality of the life—of the struggles, of the heartaches, and of the happiness. The heart is a reflection of the life that is being lived.

The youthful heart pounds heavily, pumping blood through the body with vitality and force. This rhythmic pounding is full of promise of the life to be lived, and it pushes towards growth and development. The youthful heart feels little pain, but is easily bruised when love is denied by cherished caregivers. Each experience of heartache or love molds the heart into its role as the carrier of emotional stability and physical stamina.

The rhythm of the heart changes as the years fly by. Slowing or quickening occur depending on choices made and lifestyle led. The heart provides support for new life being created in the womb. The heart supports through times of crises and despair. It pumps through competitive displays of movement and concentration, and then adjusts for feelings of success or defeat. The heart steadfastly beats, even when it and other parts of the body are abused through malnourishment or mistreatment.

The heart ages, and with its aging come reflections in the body. For some, the aging heart is reflected in rhythmic melodies in the mind. For others, the aging heart is reflected in rhythmic movements of the hands (often mistaken for Parkinson’s disease). The aging is natural and is influenced by childhood diseases, physical stamina, and medications ingested.

Rhythmic beating from the heart to the body is part of life and its wonder: each heart beating its rhythm, each heart joining in the syncopated symphony that beats on and on in the community of planet Earth!

Note: This post was delivered to me through my heart’s connection to Spirit.

Letting the Body Heal

healing-well

In “Samba ’til the End— Experiencing Well-Being in the Later Years”, one of the maintenance tips for aging well is to listen to your body and find healing through natural means.

Our bodies are designed to monitor and fix themselves, but the monitoring and fixing take time. When we choose activities, foods, or lifestyles that overwhelm natural healing, the monitoring and fixing slow or stop. Listening to our bodies when they are overwhelmed is crucial to healing. Without the natural monitoring and fixing, diseases and illnesses can overtake and overwhelm our bodies.

Negative Influences

Here are activities, foods, and lifestyles that slow or stop the body’s ability to monitor and fix itself.

Undereating; a sedentary lifestyle; overusing medications, alcohol, or tobacco; worrying; accepting other people’s evaluations of your health when you feel they are incorrect; hydrogenated-manipulated food stuff; eating and drinking artificially sweetened or sugared drinks and food; disdain and contempt for others; toxic and addictive substances; constricting posture; inactivation or removal of organs and other body parts; stress; exposure to toxic substances; and rejection of bodily signals to sleep, eliminate, extend (the muscles), or eat.

Positive Influences

Here are activities, foods, and lifestyles that enhance the body’s ability to monitor and fix itself.

Deep breathing; a giving lifestyle; smiling; preventative health care; attention to posture; a diet rich in vegetables, whole grains, and enjoyment (mealtimes that are pleasant and not rushed); spending time with nature:  in parks, at a beach, on a hike, and connecting with the seasons; active movement: walking, dancing, swimming, etc.; paying attention to the body’s signals of unwellness and helping it heal through rest and protection; eating and drinking in moderation; love; and acknowledgement of bodily signals to sleep, eliminate, extend (the muscles), or eat.

Healing and Disease

Healing won’t take place when attitude and disease overtake the healing mechanisms. A positive attitude can counter disease, but the positive attitude must be sincere to have impact.

Healing and Aging

Aging affects the body’s speed of healing. In general, healing slows. When healing has slowed, the impact of positive and negative influences is more pronounced. Negative influences can speed death and render the aging unbearable. Positive influences can increase life expectancy and render the aging enjoyable. Healing remains active when the body is treated well.

Samba til the end

For guidance with aging and healing read “Samba ’til the End”. It is available at amazon.com: https://amzn.com/1537449907

Aging can be an adventure, even at 65 and beyond

Samba til the end

Aging is exciting when the future is full of promise. At any age, the future can be optimistic if a commitment is made to one’s own talents and interests.

A person who is 65 can be as adventuresome as a person who is 25, when passion for causes and interests is allowed to guide day-to-day living.

Arriving at middle age is a time for reassessing habits and goals.  It is also a time for planning aging so that the future is fulfilling, meaningful, and energetic.

Here is a book to help you reassess your current habits and choices and age well. “Samba ‘til the End” is a guide to growing older and enjoying the journey.  The book presents specific guidelines depending on your health and outlook.

There are several questionnaires to determine the guidelines that suit you. There are assessments to help you create a roadmap to your future. The guidelines present goals for physical, emotional, and intellectual health. They present tips for self-care, maintenance, nutrition, and legacy building. The guidelines can lead towards aging that is rewarding, energetic, and kind.

This book can help you age with focus and wisdom. It is available through amazon stores.

Aging well—guidance for the journey!

Samba til the end

Here is a book to help you age energetically. “Samba ‘til the End” is a guide to growing older and enjoying the journey.  The book presents specific guidelines depending on your health and outlook.

There are several questionnaires to determine the guidelines that suit you. There are assessments to help you create a roadmap to your future. The guidelines present goals for physical, emotional, and intellectual health. They present tips for self-care, maintenance, nutrition, and legacy building. The guidelines can lead towards aging that is rewarding and kind.

“Samba ‘til the End” looks at aging as a very gradual approach to the end. The gradual approach lasts decades, and it is an opportunity to create meaningful connections and opportunities that fulfill and energize. The gradual approach can be a time of growth, well-being, and satisfaction.

This book can help you age with focus and wisdom. It is available through amazon.com stores: https://amzn.com/1537449907

She Returns Her Anticipation—the Secret to Youthful Aging

Anticipation

There is a video circulating on the Internet of a 90-year-old woman who dances with several men. The video isn’t amazing because the woman is doing extraordinary gymnastic moves while she dances. It’s amazing because she is moving without signs of aging, with suppleness and with youthfulness. Her joy in moving is apparent and her enjoyment of the dance is catching.

After watching that video, I immediately got up and danced. No dance partners magically appeared, but I danced with a smile and I danced with lightness in my steps.

After I danced, I paused and considered the older people I know. None of them display the agility of the woman in the video. They seem more stuck in the accumulation of their years.

My curiosity led me to consult with Spiritual Presence, and so I asked “What is the secret to her joy?” “What keeps her youthful?” Through my asking technique, I worked out this answer:  “She returns her anticipation.”  What does that mean?  The answer is the subject of this blog post. Now I’m going to work out the meaning.

She returns her anticipation

This woman has not lived a life that was trouble-free or worriless. On the contrary, her life was filled with hardship and struggles. Three things she did throughout her life were to keep moving, keep smiling, and keep anticipating.

She anticipated the next day and the day after. She anticipated forbearance and she anticipated solutions. Her anticipation kept her open and curious. Her anticipation kept her spirits up and her worries down. Even today, as she ages and wrinkles, this woman grasps the possibilities that each day brings. Her anticipation of life ignites those around her and her infectious nature is returned to her by those who reflect it back at her.

The secret to youthful aging

And so, for all who are searching for the key to youthful aging, the secret is not in plastic surgery or special creams or anti-aging treatments. The secret to youthful aging is to return the anticipation. Anticipation of life adds twinkling to the eyes and lightness to the steps!

Prevention of poor health–>Stop the causes!

Forty

The following list was presented in two earlier blog posts. I am presenting it again because it is really important. Please look at each contributor to poor health and consider it. Each one won’t apply to you, but it may apply to someone you love.

Notice that sleep deprivation is the second major contributor of poor health. This one is really not that hard to fix. Notice the third contributor. Letting the body heal itself when possible can lessen the grasp of this contributor. Notice number five. then get up and dance around or walk in place.

Each contributor can be lessened.

——–

In modern societies, there are 40 reasons that a person becomes deceased too early or suffers too much. Here are the reasons in the order in which they contribute (accidents and disasters are not included):

  1. Overconsumption of alcoholic beverages
  2.  Sleep deprivation
  3.  Misuse of legal drugs
  4.  Depression
  5.  Insufficient regular movement of the body
  6.  Overuse of cigarettes
  7.  Insufficient protection from the elements (cold, heat, etc.)
  8.  Chronic insufficient consumption of water
  9.  Overconsumption of food
  10.  Insufficient exposure to the environment (nature)
  11.  Worry, fear, and anguish
  12.  Suppression of negative emotions (worry, fear, and anguish)
  13.  Hurt feelings
  14.  Blood pressure pressures
  15.  Isolation
  16.  Genetics
  17.  Misjudgment of self-boundaries (When relating to other people, not understanding how to bond. When relating to tangible items, not understanding limits and excess.)
  18.  Insufficient intake of vitamin-rich foods
  19.  Memory loss
  20.  Insufficient intake of mineral-rich foods
  21.  Digestive disturbances
  22.  Elimination issues, such as constipation
  23.  Too much dependence on approval from others
  24.  Inadvertent consumption of foods that cause allergic reactions
  25.  Overexposure to toxins
  26.  Sense of unworthiness
  27.  Misuse of illegal drugs
  28.  Purposelessness
  29.  Sadness
  30.  Misjudgments in sexual relations
  31.  Lack of trust in one’s intuition
  32.  Chronic under-usage of the thinking capabilities
  33.  Overemphasis on physicality
  34.  Anger
  35.  Jealousy
  36.  Eating too little
  37.  Indifference
  38.  Overusing the body physically
  39.  Feelings of devaluing others
  40.  Choice inundation

 You may have noticed that shallow breathing and other breathing issues are not on the list. Improper breathing results from many of these issues so that breathing, or rather, incorrect breathing, is often part of the causes.

The forty contributors to ill health and to possible…

Forty

In modern societies, there are 40 reasons that a person becomes deceased too early or suffers too much. Here are the reasons in the order in which they contribute (accidents and disasters are not included):

  1. Overconsumption of alcoholic beverages
  2.  Sleep deprivation
  3.  Misuse of legal drugs
  4.  Depression
  5.  Insufficient regular movement of the body
  6.  Overuse of cigarettes
  7.  Insufficient protection from the elements (cold, heat, etc.)
  8.  Chronic insufficient consumption of water
  9.  Overconsumption of food
  10.  Insufficient exposure to the environment (nature)
  11.  Worry, fear, and anguish
  12.  Suppression of negative emotions (worry, fear, and anguish)
  13.  Hurt feelings
  14.  Blood pressure pressures
  15.  Isolation
  16.  Genetics
  17.  Misjudgment of self-boundaries (When relating to other people, not understanding how to bond. When relating to tangible items, not understanding limits and excess.)
  18.  Insufficient intake of vitamin-rich foods
  19.  Memory loss
  20.  Insufficient intake of mineral-rich foods
  21.  Digestive disturbances
  22.  Elimination issues, such as constipation
  23.  Too much dependence on approval from others
  24.  Inadvertent consumption of foods that cause allergic reactions
  25.  Overexposure to toxins
  26.  Sense of unworthiness
  27.  Misuse of illegal drugs
  28.  Purposelessness
  29.  Sadness
  30.  Misjudgments in sexual relations
  31.  Lack of trust in one’s intuition
  32.  Chronic under-usage of the thinking capabilities
  33.  Overemphasis on physicality
  34.  Anger
  35.  Jealousy
  36.  Eating too little
  37.  Indifference
  38.  Overusing the body physically
  39.  Feelings of devaluing others
  40.  Choice inundation

 You may have noticed that shallow breathing and other breathing issues are not on the list. Improper breathing results from many of these issues so that breathing, or rather, incorrect breathing, is often part of the causes.

The huff ‘n’ puff balancing cardio exercise

Here is a video showing how to do the huff’n’puff, an exercise that strengthens and balances the four components of health—physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual. It was described in an earlier blog post: https://energy-guidance-complete.com/2014/05/15/aging-is-manageable-when-breathing-is-huffnpuff-post-4/

This video presents the basic steps of the huff’n’puff. You can modify it to suit your physical abilities and concentration. It is a cardio exercise. Be sure to be well hydrated before doing the huff’n’puff.


Strengthening all four components of health at once is a way to age wisely.

Happy huffin’n’puffin!

Health throughout aging, post #7

Post 131-huff'n'puff flowers

Many people want to age well without investing in wellness. Just doesn’t happen. Aging well involves lifelong commitment. The commitment? Awareness. Awareness of growth and awareness of decline. Both states exist simultaneously and they present us with daily treasures and possibilities.

There are three key steps to maintaining health throughout the aging process. The first step is proper breathing, When we breathe properly, we bring possibilities to our existence. We are aware of the next two steps, but perhaps we don’t realize their key-ness. They are love of oneself and connection to others.

Breathing properly

The last six blog posts have extolled the value of proper breathing.—breathing that is full and varied, breathing that is enlivened through movement and exercise, breathing that is contented, and breathing that is joined with others. The first step towards aging well is breathing well.

Caring for and loving oneself

There are several blog posts about self-love which you can find in the category titled “Self-love”. The more we care for our needs, the more we can give to others and to the world in which we live. Loving oneself is not a selfish thing; it is natural and necessary for maintaining good health throughout the aging process.

Connecting to others

There are several blog posts about connections which you can find in the category titled “Connections”. “Togetherness is vital for normal human development.” – from my upcoming book, Awaiting Light—Understanding the Development of the Soul. People are designed to connect to other people,  to nature, and to the other inhabitants of the world.

How to proceed

There are no magic bullets for aging well. There are no super foods or super exercises. There is simply living life with awareness—awareness of one’s surroundings and awareness of one’s place in them. Mistakes get made along the lifepath. If they are not too serious then their impact is not too seriously felt.

Here are the things to do:

  • Drink water when you’re thirsty (no other drinks)
  • Sleep the amount of time that keeps you functioning energetically (not easy for parents of infants, but somewhat doable even for them)
  • Eat foods that are satisfying to the body (see the blog posts in the category titled “Food”)
  • Move a lot—take breaks, walk, dance, skip, etc.
  • Pay attention to the activities that pull your attention so that you know the things that you naturally enjoy. Then make time to do them.
  • Spend time with family and friends. We need them when we are up and when we are down. And they need us too.
  • Spend time in nature!
  • Work with a smile on your face and gratitude in your heart!
  • Be satisfied!

These are the things that Spiritual Presence wants us to know. These things help lead us through life in a fulfilling way. These things bring awareness, possibilities, and vitality!

Post 130-breathe

 

Aging is manageable when breathing is free, post #6

 

Sequoia

Many people live long, but their lives are plagued by ill health and/or ill mental health. What can we do to live more “not ill” and to live less worriedly about difficult aging? The last five blog posts have explained the importance of breathing for quality health.

Being in nature naturally opens our bodies to healing breathing when two conditions are met: 1) we want to be there and 2) we consciously connect with the flora surrounding us.

Two conditions neutralize the healthful aspects of being in nature: 1) we focus on other stimuli such as headphone-delivered music or words and 2) we consciously ignoring the flora that surround us.

Two conditions cause detrimental consequences when we are in nature: 1) fear and 2) worry.

Here is a personal example of the various conditions. Two years ago (before I was knowingly connected to Spiritual Presence), I went to Sequoia National Park with my husband and children. The weather was hot (August), but we were dressed appropriately and had plenty of water with us.  As we entered the park, I was overwhelmed by the beauty and the majesty of the trees, and I was keen to start our hike. Off to a good start for healing breathing.

We went to the visitor’s center to buy a map and learn whatever the park workers had to tell us. The excitement to get walking was building. As we were buying the map, the worker who was helping us warned us about the presence of bears in the park. I, who grew up fearful, immediately became fearful. I tried to pretend that I was not, but inside I felt frightened. On the hike, my family wanted to stray from the populated paths and walk in the more interesting areas. At first I agreed, but the fear nagged at me. I did enjoy the magnificent trees and I did feel SO grateful to be there, but the fear kept encroaching on my happiness. After we met up with other hikers who had spotted a bear in the distance, I urged my family to go back to a less secluded path. I kept my fear to myself because they were having such a wonderful time, but it remained my constant companion until we were back on the way with the masses. From that point on, I relaxed and enjoyed the wonderful green world around me.

My fearful existence during that hike did not contribute to my good health. The fear was too strong for the circumstances. The others in my family experienced the healing breathing that accompanies connection to nature.

Being in nature should be nourishing, not the opposite. Nature is here as our healing space, if only we can see that. We receive much, much more than we realize when we connect to all that nature has to offer. (I wish I had known that at Sequoia before I let myself give way to old fears. These days, I am more accepting of the uncertainty that comes with walking in the woods.)

 

That’s it for now. We’ll continue to explore breathing in one more post.

Aging is manageable when breathing in unison, post #5

Post 132-breathe-in unison

Breathing is key to longevity and quality of life. The rhythmic movements of the diaphragm and lungs determine vitality. Supplying oxygen, supplying force.

Joining together in song is longevity and life-quality bait.  The more we sing with others, the more possibility of bypassing lower quality living.

Singing in a choir

People who take part in choral singing increase their quality of life, if the atmosphere in the group is uplifting. When ill-thoughts abound in the group, there is no increase in quality of life—and there is no decrease either. The actions of the organizer are no more influential than the actions of a single member; therefore, each member contributes to the overall atmosphere of elevation or neutrality. People who sing in a choir need to be cognizant of their contribution to the group besides their harmonies. (This statement does not mean that people who sing in choirs should not attend a practice because they had a hard day. It means they should be participating in the group because they really want to be there. They should not let idiosyncrasies of others in the group lower their group experience.)

Singing in a de facto choir

People who take part in group singing, such as at a religious service or a music concert, can also have their quality of life increased by the experiences, if the atmosphere is transcendent. In these circumstances, the actions of each participant is less important to the overall achievement of the group. Even the singing of one song by the group can influence quality of life. Singing from the heart is the key ingredient.

Breathing and singing

Contented breathing can occur when a group (of three or more) joins force in song. The actual sound does not need to be beautiful, but the intent does. Singing to feel joyousness, singing to entertain one another, and singing to satisfy the need to sing bring connectedness that is beyond ordinary communication. (For an explanation of contented breathing, see the blog post “Aging is manageable when breathing is contented, post #3”).

Singing alone

The need to sing is stronger in some people. It is a natural, soul-bestowed need. People who feel they must sing should not bottle-up this need. They require song in their ears, in their throat, and in their entire being. The reverberation of sound in the entire being brings balance and connectedness for them. When they sing, whether in a group or alone, transcendence can occur if they understand the force of the self-made music. This last statement also applies to people who create music using instruments.

 

That’s it for now. We’ll explore breathing more in the next post.

Aging is manageable when breathing is huff’n’puff, post #4

Post 131-huff'n'puff flowers This post is a continuation of the information I have been receiving from Spiritual Presence about aging well. Physical exertion is necessary for aging well. The breathing that accompanies physical exertion strengthens the body and prepares it to handle unexpected traumas and illness. There are many types of physical exertion that induce strengthened capabilities. Each person is drawn to different types of physical activity. Most physical activity builds and maintains the physical component of health. Some types of physical activity also affect other components of health—emotional and intellectual. Less often, physical activity affects all the components of health, which includes the spiritual component. Achieving physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual strengthening and balancing through a single type of physical activity is possible through the following exercise that I am going to teach you (as given to me by Spiritual Presence). It is called the huff’n’puff. It’s sort of a marching exercise.

How to do the huff’n’puff

This exercise must be done outside. While doing the exercise, you should look at a flower or flowering plant that is low so that your chin will be held slightly downward. If the plant is too high and your head is held straight forward or higher, then your breathing will not be correct and balance will not be achieved. If there are no flowers, then look at an interesting low plant.

  • Before you start, become aware of the physical and spiritual balance points on your body. One point is located in the middle of the ascending colon and one point is located in the middle of the descending colon. My simple diagram will give you an idea of where they are located:

Post 131-huff'n'puff diagram As you do the exercise, try to physically support these points (basically, that means to suck in your gut. Actually, it’s more than that, but sucking in your gut is a good start.)

  • Stand opposite the flower with your feet comfortably apart, with your chin slightly down and look at the flower.
  • Your feet will be doing a sort of march in place: one leg marches and the other leg kicks forward. You will alternate the marching/kicking whenever you feel like switching leg activity.
  • As you march, your arms will swing energetically as if you are walking at an energetic pace. Every so often you will raise your arms over your head and wave them from side to side. Alternate the two arm motions as you like.
  • The entire time you do this exercise, you focus on the flower, noticing its characteristics.  To add the spiritual dimension to the exercise, while you are looking at the flower, marvel at its wondrousness.
  • Do this exercise for as long as you feel comfortable. Each person is at a different physical activity level.

I will aim to make a video explaining how to do the huff’n’puff.  If my instructions are clear to you, go ahead and try it. I’ve done it and it’s not hard.

Update: Here is the video: https://energy-guidance-complete.com/2014/05/25/the-huff-n-puff-balancing-cardio-exercise/

Strengthening all four components of health at once is a way to age wisely!

Aging is manageable when breathing is contented, post #3

Post 130-breathe

This post is a continuation of the information I have been receiving from Spiritual Presence about aging well. It was inspired after I watched a report about people living into their 90s.

The key to good health throughout life is breathing as designed. We are designed to breathe rapidly, slowly, at a neutral pace, and contentedly. Contented breathing is the subject for this post.

What is contented breathing?

For contented breathing to occur, several emotions must surface in a short space of time. These emotions can be satisfaction, caring, serenity, devotion, joyousness, and transcendence (also other emotions that are similar). Contented breathing requires three of these emotions to be felt within minutes of one another.

What leads to contented breathing?

Typical actions that can lead to contented breathing are 1) feeling a part of the world while being in nature, 2) having sexual intercourse with a person you love and in the course of the contact orgasm is achieved, 3) for women—breastfeeding in a relaxed and nourishing environment, 4) for men—total immersion in a challenging and interesting endeavor, 5) taking part in family or community events that bring joy and feelings of generosity, and 6) taking part in children’s views (which means feeling a child’s view when interacting with children).

Participation in sporting events sometimes leads to contented breathing, but mostly to rapid and neutral breathing. Same for dancing and attending performances. Creating music can lead to contented breathing depending on the feelings of the musician at the time.

Contented breathing: breathing that is all-components

When contented breathing takes places, all the components of health are nourished. The breathing exercise from yesterday’s post teaches contented breathing. Contented breathing connects the physical with the spiritual with the intellectual with the emotional.

 

That’s it for now. We’ll explore breathing more in the next post.

Aging is manageable when breathing is understood, post #2

Post 129-breathe

Breathing is key to longevity and quality of life. The rhythmic movements of the diaphragm and lungs determine vitality. Supplying oxygen, supplying force.

Many people attempt to lengthen their life by eating well or by seeking purpose. They misjudge sometimes.

Eating well?

Eating well is important; however, people who focus on the food they eat as if it is the answer to all their problems and they lose sight of proportion often breathe narrowly. They are too worried about each morsel that enters their mouth and they create an opposite effect–>the worry alters breathing negatively which then alters quality of life negatively.

People should eat wholesome and nourishing foods because the body requires them to function properly. The over-focus about nutrients and the under-focus about joyful eating create breathing that is stifled. Not good for aging wisely.

Looking for meaning?

Searching for meaning in life is uplifting, but can create havoc for the body when the focus on spirituality outweighs body care. Spirituality is just one aspect of living. Health of the body, emotions, and intellect are important as well. Deep breathing performed in meditative mindset is beneficial—yes, very beneficial.  But it is just one type of breathing that the body needs for creating good health.

Purposeful living brings many benefits, and one of those benefits can be longevity. Purposeful living combined with varied breathing (deep, neutral [neither deep nor quick], quick, intensified, and happy [when the emotions produce feeling of contentment]) lead to aging that is less troublesome.

An exercise to reach all four components of health

“When you breathe, you do so much more than fill the lungs with oxygen. You fill the body and soul with life-giving force.

Each day when you awaken, breathe deeply and remind yourself that your breathing adds oxygen to your lungs, adds hope to your emotional being, ignites your thinking abilities, and connects you to spiritual possibility.”

-from Vitality!—How to Create a Life That Is Healthy (to be published soon)

 

That’s it for now. We’ll explore breathing more in the next post.

Aging is manageable when done properly

Post 128-breathe

I recently watched a report about people living into their 90s. The researchers looked at lifestyle and physical factors. In general, they were confounded by what they learned. Things that people think aren’t good for you seemed to be somewhat helpful (not talking about smoking or obesity, which aren’t good).

Many people live long, but their lives are plagued by ill physical health and/or ill mental health. What can we do to live more “not ill” and to live less worriedly about difficult aging.

I have just asked Spiritual Presence what we need to do to not only live longer, but to live well. Here is the main tip: BREATHE! The more varied, deeper, relaxed, intensified, the more a person can live well.

B—R—E–A–T—H—E! breathe!! Br-e-at-he! breathe! BrEEEEEth!

The more varied the breathing, the less chance for illness to set in.

Let’s look at a few things experts tell us to do to live longer:

  • Regular exercise: it’s not the regular exercise that makes us live better, it’s the intensified and smoother breathing that regular exercise causes. Also if the exercise makes our body feel good, then we breathe more fully. Pain forces narrowed breathing. (Painkillers won’t fix the narrow breathing; addressing the cause of the pain is required.)
  • Drinking red wine: it’s not the resveratrol  in red wine that makes us live longer, it’s the relaxed breathing that moderate drinking induces.
  • Social involvement: the more we are socially involved, the more our breathing varies as we speak with others, have physical contact, feel different emotions, etc.

That’s it for now. We’ll explore breathing more in the next post.

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